Measles Outbreak in America – Research Proposal Example

Measles Outbreak in America By trying to identify the recent cases of measles in America, I will be in a position tounderstand why a first world nation, such as the United States of America, is battling with a disease that was supposedly eradicated over 15 years ago. It would also be a goal of mine to try and delve into the aspect of anti-vaccine movements, which exist, and why they are allegedly the cause of the rapid spread of such epidemics. Furthermore, it would also be an intention of mine to comprehend why individuals in the 21st century have not been vaccinated against a disease such as measles (Peters and Perez-Pena 1). These are some of the reasons why I chose this topic for my research proposal, and why it would be important for individuals to realize that the nation is headed toward tumultuous times if certain things are not dealt with in advance (Bernstein and Dennis 1).
I chose the measles outbreak in America as the main topic for the research paper, because it is interesting to note that a nation that is often considered a first world nation is having to fight diseases that should ultimately be non-existent. The manner in which the situation is being dealt with is also not instilling confidence among the American citizens (Turkewitz and Cave). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have reported different cases, but it is possible that they have not recorded every case. An outbreak that has riddled different states and affected a number people should be cause for concern among the American public. From what is evident, it is clear that some of the anti-vaccine movements are to blame for the unvaccinated people affected. By trying to bring out different agendas on the subject of vaccination, it is possible they might have influenced people not to get vaccinated.
In order to frame this issue/topic as a research paper, I would have to bring in different aspects of the issue at hand, and the extent to which it may have affected the larger population. Also, identifying the health risks that are presented by this issue would enable me to create insight into how the topic is relevant, and why it is crucial to evaluate different options to tackle the issue. A research paper is meant to find out some of the factors that are responsible for a certain occurrence or phenomenon. In this case, it would be vital for me to address such factors in order to get or acquire the full picture of what is happening in the United States. In addition, I would also have to bring in different statistics on the spread of measles in the region. These statistics might point out the areas affected, and what can be done to solve the problem before it gets worse (Castillo 1).
In framing the research paper, identifying some of the goals would be key in ensuring that individuals understand the extent of the problem, and how much can be done to salvage it. One of the main goals would be to enlighten, inform, and educate individuals on the importance of vaccination (Grady 1). By making people understand that this is an important process in the growth and development of health in society, it would be possible to reduce the number of such cases. Also, by identifying which areas are most affected, it would be easier to reach a wider audience through statistics and facts about what is actually going on that is affecting the health sector in America. This is especially with regards to diseases that should have been eradicated decades ago. This would demonstrate that America should not be facing such problems in this day and age.
My argument would be against most of the people that fight against the health sector for various reasons. It is important for the general public to be protected from diseases that can be spread through various means, for example; measles or even smallpox. In the event that certain groups think that there is an ulterior motive behind some protective measures, then it is not their place to influence or coerce others against such measures (Loehrke and Szabo 1). Even if they claim to be their civil rights to accept or decline any treatment, it is not their prerogative to influence others to refuse such vaccination measures. Education on the subject of immunization and/or vaccination should be the main point being put across, in order to ensure that individuals get the full picture of what happens when epidemics occur.
The use of newspaper articles, peer reviewed articles and journals will be the main sources of information in this research report. These sources will be effective, because they might guide me in finding out facts about the outbreak, and how many individuals are affected so far (Glenza 1). They may also provide insight into how the disease got into the United States and the measures being carried out to ensure that it does not become a full-blown pandemic. They may also map the way forward for citizens who might need reassurance on the commitment of the government on how it is safeguarding its citizens.
Works Cited
Bernstein, Lenny and Brady Dennis. “Measles Outbreak Spreads to Three More States and Washington DC; 121 People Now Affected.” The Washington Post 9 Feb. 2015. Print.
Castillo, Mariano. “Measles Outbreak: How Bad Is It?” CNN 3 Feb. 2015. Print.
Glenza, Jessica. “Measles Outbreak Worsens in US After Unvaccinated Woman Visits Disneyland.” The Guardian 14 Jan. 2015. Print.
Grady, Denise. “Measles: Perilous but Preventable.” The New York Times 2 Feb. 2015.
Loehrke, Janet and Liz, Szabo. “The Measles Outbreak and Vaccine Controversy Visualized.” USA Today 5 Feb. 2015. Print.
Peters, Jeremy and Richard, Perez-Pena. “Measles Outbreak Proves Delicate Issue to G.O.P Field.” The New York Times 2 Feb. 2015. Print.
Turkewitz, Julie and Damien, Cave. “As Measles Cases Spread in U.S., So Does Anxiety.” The New York Times 30 Jan. 2015.