How Parental Care Activities at Home Influence Social Skills Development of Children in Early Childhood Education – Research Proposal Example

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The paper “ How Parental Care Activities at Home Influence Social Skills Development of Children in Early Childhood Education” is an excellent example of a research proposal on education. The parents perform a vital role in the life of a young child, specifically during the early years; an opportunity that later determines the physical, psychological, and social progress of the child in the future (Moradeke, Oludare & Funke, 2012). For example, parents have been found to influence the performance of their children in schools (Brotman et al. , 2011, Moradeke, Oludare & Funke, 2012).

Therefore, the primary goal of this research project is to evaluate parental care activities at home and how they influence the social skills development of children in early childhood education. 1.2 Background of the studyAccording to findings by the World Health Organisation (WHO), parents, especially in a family setting, performs a critical role during the initial years of a child’ s life. Family is seen to be an appropriate primary environment for nurturing and encouraging children’ s socialization and initial contact with the larger society or community (cited in the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, 2011).

At the same time, the home environment facilitates the development of critical elements in a child; key senses in a child, how to interact in the society with other people, development of communication and language abilities, and related physical activity of a child. All these aspects combine to enhance the healthy development and learning of young children (Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, 2011). Besides, it has been ascertained that the relationship parents establish with children early in life is a strong influence on both short and lasting growth and learning processes (Sedigheh, 2011). 1.3 Statement of the problemGreater attention has been directed towards establishing the link between the home environment and the performance of children in higher grades (Chao & Willms, 2002).

As a result, research in early childhood education remains ‘ young’ that calls for more effort directed at conducting more studies to enrich the field. 1.4 Purpose of the studyThe home environment remains critical to the human development aspect of a child. Early forms of parental care that a child is exposed to become critical in determining the way the child becomes functional in social and academic lives.

Early childhood education programs can be enhanced when a clear link is established between the home environment and early childhood education of a child. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate parental care activities at home and how they influence the social development of children in early childhood education. 1.5 Objectives of the studyThe major objectives to be studied in this project including; To identify parental care activities at home that children in early childhood education receive. To establish how parental care activities influence the social skills development of children in their early education in kindergarten. To evaluate the social skills development of children attending kindergarten in their early years of development. 1.6 Research questions Research questions, unlike the ordinary questions, are more inquisitorial in the sense that they expect precise answers.

The research questions to be investigated include; What are parental care activities at home that children in early childhood education received? How do parental care activities influence the social skills development of children in kindergarten education? What social skills do children in kindergarten education develop as a result of the quality of the home environment?      

References

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