A National Curriculum for Australian Schools - Perspectives of Teachers and Parents – Research Proposal Example

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The paper “ A National Curriculum for Australian Schools - Perspectives of Teachers and Parents” is an excellent example of a research proposal on education. This proposed study concerns itself with the perspectives of teachers and parents on the proposed National Curriculum for school children in Australia. There is an ongoing debate in Australian society on the shape and form of the proposed National Curriculum for school children in Australia. The debate also includes what should be the shape and structure of the authority set up to develop the National Curriculum for schools in Australia.

Teachers with their interaction with children and parents as consumers in education are important to the National Curriculum for schools in Australia. The study will explore the perspectives of the teachers and parents in this national debate on a national curriculum to identify themes in these perspectives and attempt to provide meaningful findings that can act as contributions to the development of the National Curriculum for school children in Australia. Aims of the StudyThe objective of this study is to explore the perspectives of the teachers and parents on the proposed national curriculum for schools in Australia.

Teachers have been chosen as a group as they are responsible for the ultimate delivery of the curriculum to school children and their many years of interaction with children endows them with the experience of knowing what would be a meaningful curriculum for school children and the issues that are likely to arise in its delivery. Parents make up the second group of the study and are the real consumers of the school education system. They have their concerns on what needs to be taught to their children and this is the reason for the inclusion of this group of the population The study aims to use a sample population of the teachers and parents in Canberra for the purposes of the study, as Canberra offers a mix of Independent Schools and Public Schools.

Furthermore, though the Australian Capital Territory in which Canberra is located is the smallest among the States and Territories of Australia, it is the most densely populated area, with a high number of schools and teachers (Australian Capital Territory). The aims of the study are: Identify themes in the relevant literature on the perspectives of the teachers and parents in Australia on the proposed National Curriculum. Determine the views of the teachers in Canberra on the contents of the National Curriculum. Identify the concerns of the parents in Canberra on the contents of the National Curriculum. Practical Importance of these AimsThe findings of the study will provide evidence-based information on what the teachers and parents believe about the shape and form of the proposed National Curriculum in Australia.

This evidence-based information can be used to influence the shape and form of the proposed National Curriculum and can also be used to influence the structure of the body being created for the development of the National Curriculum. It is the teachers that deliver the curriculum to the students at the grass-root level of the classrooms in schools.

This puts them in an ideal position to evaluate the impact of the existing curriculum on the knowledge and skill levels of the school children and the gaps that exist in the content of what is currently being taught in the classrooms.

In other words, the input from teachers becomes an important factor in the development of an effective National Curriculum to attain the goals of school education in Australia.

References

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