Can the Height of Barrier Plate Affect the Efficiency of the Cleaning Unit of Grain Harvester Separation for Harvest-Time Weed Seed Collection – Research Proposal Example

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The paper “ Can the Height of Barrier Plate Affect the Efficiency of the Cleaning Unit of Grain Harvester Separation for Harvest-Time Weed Seed Collection? ”   is a breathtaking variant of research proposal on engineering and construction. Researches have suggested different methods that can affect the efficiency of the cleaning unit of grain harvesters for separation time weed seed collection. One of such methods is the adjustment of the air velocity or adjustment of the sieve inclination (McDonald and Copeland, 2012). However, there is a need to assess whether the barrier plate affects the efficiency of the cleaning unit of grain harvester separation for harvest-time weed seed separation.

The research question as suggested proposes a method of improving grain harvester separation efficiency by proposing the best height of the plate barrier that will effectively allow the cleaning unit of the grain harvester separation. One objective of the research is to critically assess whether the height of the barrier plate affects the efficiency of a cleaning unit of grain harvester separation for harvest-time weed seed collection. The objective has been chosen since it is the broad point about what the research hopes to accomplish and the desired outcome from the process of researching.

The objective has focussed on long-term outcomes intended to ascertain recent trends in grain harvester separation for harvest-time weed seed collection in general and the efficiency of cleaning unit of grain harvester separation for harvest-time weed seed collection in particular. In addition, the objective introduces what is missing from the previous researches such as Berry et al. (2012); Owen et al. (2014); Vogel and Peukert (2003) as reviewed thus identifying the gap in knowledge.

The gap in knowledge that the proposal finds to be holding back the field is what the entire research will attempt to address thus providing the linkage or concordance between the identified objective and parts of central hypotheses that have been inherent in reviewed studies such as Westerman et al. (2012). The second objective of the research is to assess whether there is a demonstration of the systematic methodologies of approaching the design of grain harvester separation for harvest-time weed seed collection and management which is also essential in knowing the method which influences its efficiency.

Other than focusing on the objective of the research as detailed above, readers will find the following objectives as thesis focus: The best method of designing the height of the barrier for cleaning unit of grain harvester separation for harvest-time weed seed collection Giving an explanation on the correct ways of using the designed height of the barrier plate and tools which can be applied by project engineers and farmers at different times so as to contribute the efficiency of the grain harvester separation. From this perspective, generally, while the objectives as stated above seem to be broad in their approach, they are focussed and practical when put as follows: Critically compare quantitative and qualitative data from previous researches, experiments as well as respondents from questionnaires and interviews proposed by this study with a view to integrating such with literature reviews and understand the research question. The objective, on the other hand, has been designed to augur well with plans the research intends to take in order to deal with the practical problems or ethical issues that may be encountered.

As Walsh and Powles (2014) argued, research objectives can also help in having a research plan, choosing the interview theme, and shaping the questions that will be asked during data collection. Again, it is specific and thus linking the secondary research problem. Another point to note regarding the objective is that they show that the research proposal will be looking for actionable information and knowledge from qualitative research and it is for this reason that the question is general thus helping to link the primary research problems.

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Owen, M. J., Martinez, N. J., & Powles, S. B. (2014). Multiple herbicide‐resistant Lolium rigidum (annual ryegrass) now dominates across the Western Australian grain belt. Weed Research, 54(3), 314-324.

Vogel, L. & Peukert, W. (2003). Breakage behavior of different materials--the construction of a master curve for the breakage probability. Powder Technology, 129:101-110.

Walsh, M. J. & Powles, S. B. (2007). Management of herbicide resistance in wheat cropping systems: Learning from the Australian experience, Pest Management Science, vol 70, no 9, pp 1324-1328.

Walsh, M. J., & Powles, S. B. (2014). High seed retention at maturity of annual weeds infesting crop fields highlights the potential for harvest weed seed control. Weed Technology, 28(3), 486-493.

Walsh, M. J., Harrington, R. B. & Powles, S. B. (2012). Harrington Seed Destructor: A New Nonchemical Weed Control Tool for Global Grain Crops. Crop Sci., 52:1343-1347.

Westerman, P.R., Atanackovic, V., Royo-Esnal, A., Torra, J. (2012) Differential weed seed removal in dryland cereals, Arthropod-Plant Interactions, vol 6, no 4, pp 591-599.

Wollner, A., Bartos, P., Celjak, I., Dolan, A., & Petrovic, A. (2015). Rating of Harvester Threshers Case 8120 and New Holland CX 8080.

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