Action Learning Plan – Research Proposal Example

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The paper “ Action Learning Plan” is a brilliant variant of a research proposal on education. Early childhood is one of the critical stages of learning. This stage sets the foundation for children’ s lifelong learning. It presents a platform for building a firm educational foundation for children. Nevertheless, during this stage, various variables influence the learning capability or ability of children (Shukla, 2004). A number of studies depict that self-esteem is one of the key variables that influence the learning abilities and school performance of children during their early years.

Harter (1990) defines self-esteem as the degree or extent in which a person accepts likes, and respects themself. Self-esteem is based on an individual’ s thoughts and inner feelings and not facts. According to Powell (2005), self-esteem is determined by the inner thoughts and feelings of an individual. Over the years, the influence of self-esteem on school performance has been subjected to much discussion and debate. Psychologists, theorists, parents, educators, and others have focused their efforts on building the self-esteem of students in a bid to improve their performance in school.

Most of these efforts have been based on the assumption that there is a close link between self-esteem and school performance. With reference to this notion, it is assumed that students with a high level of self-esteem are bound to perform better than students with low self-esteem (Baumeister et al 2003). A good number of studies have established a close relationship between self-esteem levels and the performance of students in various learning activities (Alpay, 2002). For instance, studies conducted by Kaniuka (2010) and Gray (2010) demonstrate that early readers with high self-esteem read with more confidence than students with low levels of self-esteem.

Conversely, other studies show that there is no positive correlation between the performance of students in school and their self-esteem level. For example, studies conducted by Rubin, Dorle& Sandidge (2006) and Vitale & Kaniuka (2009), refute the claims that self-esteem influences the performance of students in various learning activities. These researchers argue that academic performance can influence the self-esteem of an individual and not the other way round. Some of these researchers argue that studies that show a positive correlation between self-esteem and school performance fail to put into account various variables that influence academic performance such as the IQ of the student and socio-economic factors revolving around them.

Hence these studies deduce that early readers with high self-esteem do not necessarily read with more confidence than students with low self-esteem. Based on a keen review of literature, it is evident that there is controversy regarding, the influence that self-esteem level of early readers has on their ability to read with confidence. Therefore, there is an existing knowledge gap and further research is recommended.

In order to bridge this knowledge gap, an empirical research study will be conducted. The key aim of this research will be to provide valid and evidence-based information on whether or not early readers with high self-esteem read with more confidence than early readers with low levels of self-esteem. Significance of the studyAs earlier stated, the study to be conducted will seek to bridge the gap in knowledge regarding the influence of self-esteem on the academic performance of students in various learning activities. This study will specifically focus on providing valid evidence on whether or not early readers with high self-esteem read with more confidence than students with low levels of self-esteem.

This study hopes to provide invaluable and evidence-based findings on this research issue. The findings of this study will provide insight to teachers, educators, policymakers, and others on how they can improve the learning outcomes of children in the early year's stages and other students in general. Due to scarce public resources, the education and care of young children may not be considered as an important priority unless there is a shift in understanding about the key factors that contribute or determine positive learning outcomes.

There is, therefore, a need for teachers, educators, policymakers, and others to fully understand the dynamics that contribute to positive learning outcomes for students as from an early age. This will effectively enable them to prioritize resources and put into place appropriate measures that may bring about positive learning outcomes for students as from an early age. Hopefully, this study will provide invaluable insights to teachers, educators, and policymakers on how they can effectively prioritize resources and put into place appropriate measures that may bring about positive learning outcomes for students as from an early age (Calman & Tarr-Whelan, 2005).

References

Alderson, P. (1995). Listening to Children: Children, Ethics, and Social Research. Barkingside: Barnado’s.

Alderson, P. (2000). ‘Children as Researchers: the Effects of Participation Rights on Research Methodology’, in Research with Children-Perspectives and Practices, Christensen, P. and A. James (eds) (2000), Falmer Press.

Baumeister, R.Campbell, J. Krueger, J. &Vohs, K. (2003). Does high self-esteem cause better performance, interpersonal success, happiness, or healthier lifestyles? Psychological science in the public interest 4(1) pp. 1-43.

Blascovich, J. & Tomaka, J. (1993). "Measures of Self-Esteem." In J.P. Robinson, P.R. Shaver, and L.S. Wrightsman (eds.), Measures of Personality and Social Psychological Attitudes. Third Edition. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research.

Calman, L. & Tarr-Whelan, L. (2005). Early Childhood Education for All: A Wise Investment. New York: Legal Momentum.

Gray, A. (2010). Literacy difficulties, self-esteem, and behavior.Retrieved on 24 March 2010

from

Harter, S. (1990).Processes underlying adolescent self-concept formation. In R. Montemayor, G.R. Adams, & T. P. Gullotta (Eds.), From childhood to adolescence: A transitional period? (pp. 205-239). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Kaniuka, S. (2010). Reading achievement, attitude toward reading, and reading self-esteem

of historically low achieving students. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 37(2), 184- 188.

Lincoln Y. & Denzin, N. (2011). Handbook of Qualitative Research. London: Sage

Mack, N & Woodsong C. et al. (2005). Qualitative research methods: a data collector's field guide. North Carolina: Family Health International.

Newman I. & Benz C. (1998). Qualitative-Quantitative research methodology: exploring the interactive continuum, Illinois: SIU Press.

Potter, B. (1902). The Tale of Peter Rabbit. England: Frederick Warne & Co.

Powell, J. (2005). Self-esteem. New York: Black Rabbit Books.

Rubin, R. A., Dorle, J., &Sandidge, S. (2006). Self-esteem and school performance. Psychology in the Schools, 14, 503-507.

Shank, G. (2002). Qualitative Research: A Personal Skills Approach. New Jersey: Merril Prentice Hall.

Shukla, R. (2004). Early Childhood Care and Education. New Delhi: Sarup & Sons.

Vitale, R. &Kaniuka, T. (2009). Exploring barriers to the role of corrective reading in systemic school reform: Implications of a three-part investigation. Journal of Direct Instruction 9(4): 13-34.

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