The Use of Technology for Children with Down Syndrome in Saudi Arabia – Research Paper Example

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The paper "The Use of Technology for Children with Down Syndrome in Saudi Arabia" is a great example of a research paper on technology. The research employed a survey questionnaire with questions about the type of technological tools available in schools for children with Down syndrome (DS) in Saudi Arabia, perceptions of teachers toward the benefits of technology-assisted learning for DS students, the skills that children with DS need to use technology, the challenges of using technology for children with DS, and what can be done to improve the use of technology for children with DS.

The findings show that the sampled schools have different types of technologies but computers, iPad, and projectors are the most commonly used devices, although there are other devices such as DVD players, mobile phones, and loudspeakers among others. Many teachers understand the benefits of using technology to support children with DS and their views are supported by studies conducted in the past in the same area as presented in extant literature. The key challenges to using technology as identified by the teachers include lack of resources such as computers, lack of software designed in Arabic, and lack of proper training for teachers to enable them to handle children with DS in a better way.

Recommendations are discussed. INTRODUCTION Overview This research was conducted to determine the extent of use or technology to support the learning needs of children with DS in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The research was necessitated by the lack of information about the use of technology to assist learners with DS in the kingdom. The research was therefore aimed at sealing this gap by investigating the situation in two schools in KSA which offer education to children with DS.

Survey questionnaires were used to collect information from teachers in these schools regarding the use of technology in their work. The problem of the Study Although typically educators have used a range of teaching methods and strategies such as pacing, task analysis, and repetition to support the learning of children with DS, the use of computer technology now provides more options for teachers. The use of computer-assisted technology to support the learning of students with special needs including DS has grown exponentially in the last two decades (Klein, Cook & Richardson-Gibbs, 2001, pp.

26– 27; Black & Wood, 2003a). Despite this development, some developing countries are yet to embrace technology use for students with special learning needs. The KSA Ministry of Education has put in place policies and resources to support the education of children with special needs. However, Al rubies (2010) reports that there is a lack of comprehensive information that focuses on the needs and rights of children with special needs in KSA, including the use of technology.

While numerous studies about the use of technology to assist children with DS have been conducted in countries such as the US, there is limited information about the state of technology used to support children with this condition in KSA. Aim of the Study This research was conducted to determine the extent of the use of technology to support the learning needs of DS children in KSA. The research was necessitated by the gap in information about the use of technology to assist learners with DS in KSA.

It was therefore aimed at sealing this gap by investigating the situation in two schools in KSA which offer education to children with DS.

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