Positive Correlation between Self-Esteem Level and the Ability of Early Years Readers to Read with Confidence – Research Paper Example

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The paper “ Positive Correlation between Self-Esteem Level and the Ability of Early Years Readers to Read with Confidence” is a well-turned variant of a research paper on education. Over the years, a number of studies have been conducted to establish the relationship between self-esteem and the performance of students in school. A significant number of these studies show that the self-esteem level of a student has a direct effect on their academic performance. This implies that students with a high level of self-esteem realize high academic performance whereas those with a low level of self-esteem realize poor performance in their studies.

Basically, the premise of these findings is based on the assumption that there is a close link between self-esteem and school performance (Baumeister, Campbell, Krueger & Vohs, 2003; Kaniuka, 2010; Alpay, 2002). On the other hand, some studies have refuted the claims that there is a close link between self-esteem and the performance of students in various learning activities. Researchers who refute these claims argue that studies that have established a positive correlation between self-esteem and academic performance are not valid and reliable because they do not take into account key factors that influence academic performance such as Intelligent Quotient (IQ), genetics and the socio-economic background of a student.

In addition to this, they argue that academic performance can influence the self-esteem of a person and not the other way round (Rubin, Dorle & Sandidge, 2006; Vitale & Kaniuka, 2009). Similarly, in early childhood education, a number of studies have conducted to examine the relationship between children’ s self-esteem and their reading abilities and capabilities. For instance, research studies carried out by Gray (2010) and Kaniuka (2010) established that children with a high level of self-esteem posses better reading capabilities than children with low levels of self-esteem.

Conversely, some studies conducted in this area, portray that there is no positive correlation between the self-esteem levels of children and their reading capabilities or abilities (Rubin, Dorle & Sandidge, 2006; Vitale & Kaniuka, 2009). A critical review of the findings depicted by these studies shows that there is controversy relating to studies on the relationship between self-esteem level of children and their reading abilities and capabilities. As a result, I decided to conduct a study that will give a clear perspective on this relationship.

The key goal of my research study was to provide evidence-based findings on the relationship between self-esteem level of children and their reading abilities. I specifically focused on establishing whether or not early readers with high self-esteem levels read with more confidence than early readers with low levels of self-esteem. Significance of the studyThe key aim of the study conducted is to provide evidence-based insights into the relationship between self-esteem and the academic performance of children in various learning activities during their early years.

In this study, I directed a specific focus towards the influence of children’ s self-esteem level on children’ s abilities to read with confidence since this is a significant aspect of children’ s education during the early years. The findings of this study will provide insights to educators, teachers, parents, policymakers, and other stakeholders on how they can improve the learning outcomes of children through better curriculum content, instructional strategies, pedagogies, and educational policies. For parents and teachers, the findings of this study will help them understand the factors that influence or affect the confidence of children while reading.

It will also illuminate how teachers and parents can improve the reading abilities of their children and help them to exude confidence while reading. It is essential for teachers, educators, policymakers, parents and other stakeholders to understand the various dynamics such as self-esteem which influence the learning outcomes of children at an early age. This understanding will enable them to effectively priorities resources and implement suitable measures that can enhance the learning outcomes of children (Calman & Tarr-Whelan, 2005).        

References

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Alderson, P. (2000). ‘Children as Researchers: the Effects of Participation Rights on Research Methodology’, in Research with Children-Perspectives and Practices, Christensen, P. and A.James (eds). New York: Falmer Press.

Alpay, E., (2002).Self concept and self-esteem. Retrieved on March 21, 2012 from

Baumeister, R.Campbell, J. Krueger, J. &Vohs, K. (2003). Does high self-esteem cause better performance, interpersonal success, happiness or healthier lifestyles? Psychological science in the public interest 4(1) pp. 1-43.

Blascovich, J. & Tomaka, J. (1993). "Measures of Self-Esteem." In J.P. Robinson, P.R. Shaver, and L.S. Wrightsman (eds.), Measures of Personality and Social Psychological Attitudes. Third Edition. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research.

Calman, L. & Tarr-Whelan, L. (2005). Early Childhood Education for All: A Wise Investment. New York: Legal Momentum.

Gray, A. (2010). Literacy difficulties, self-esteem and behaviour. Retrieved on 24 March, 2010 from

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Kaniuka, S. (2010). Reading achievement, attitude toward reading, and reading self-esteem of historically low achieving students. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 37(2), 184-188.

Leary, R. (1999). “Making Sense of Self-Esteem.” American Psychological Society 8 (1) 32-35.

Lincoln Y. & Denzin, N. (2011). Handbook of Qualitative Research. London: Sage

Mack, N., Woodsong, C. & Family Health International (2005). Qualitative research methods: a data collector's field guide. North Carolina: Family Health International.

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Potter, B. (1902). The Tale of Peter Rabbit. England: Frederick Warne & Co.

Rubin, A., Dorle, J., &Sandidge, S. (2006). Self-esteem and school performance. Psychology in the Schools, 14, 503-507.

Shank, G. (2002). Qualitative Research: A Personal Skills Approach. New Jersey: Merril Prentice Hall.

Vitale, R. &Kaniuka, T. (2009). Exploring barriers to the role of corrective reading in systemic school reform: Implications of a three-part investigation. Journal of Direct Instruction 9(4): 13-34.

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