Personal Learning Goals of the Clinical Nurse Required for Attaining Success in the Care Needed by the American Nurses Credentialing Centers Magnet Designation – Personal Statement Example

Personal Learning Goals of the Clinical Nurse Specialist as an Advance Practice Nurse Clinical nurse specialists are continually establishing themselves as the best medical professionals around the globe. Many of them usually undertake further studies so as to keep up with the changing trends in the nursing field. In essence, these studies are usually as a result of the nurse’s will, thus each of them comes with different goals. This paper looks into the personal learning goals that the clinical nurse specialist has in mind in undertaking an advanced practice nursing course.
Personal Learning Goals of the Clinical Nurse Specialist as an Advance Practice Nurse
Practicing of clinical nursing specialist is taking center stage in provision of clinical expertise, organizational leadership and necessary influence required for attaining the success in the type of care that is needed by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet designation (Oermann and Floyd, 2002). In many organizations that clinical nurse specialists who have been trained as advanced practice nurses are taken, they come with quality clinical expertise, wide knowhow of the advanced technologies in the nursing field. In addition, they bring with them experience of the highest quality in advanced physiology and pathology with a general change mechanism that will ensure organizational improvement (Oermann and Floyd, 2002).
Many workers grow tired of working in a certain field; hence, they decide to re-visit classes in order to upgrade their qualifications. Many of the nurses who go for further education usually have many personal reasons and/or goals, but the most common of all include:
Better Employment
No ambitious employee would want to remain in the same position of employment forever. Today, many nurses hold hospital diplomas or associate degrees for two years and have started realizing that for them to take nursing as a career, they have to nourish their curriculum vitae via further education in the fields of provision, designing, managing and coordinating care. This is so that they can have the type of jobs they desire (Oermann and Floyd, 2002).
Increased Remuneration
The best employers in the nation and the globe are after the best qualified nurses with higher degrees. These firms pay quite good salaries for the best minds they lay their hands on; hence, further training enables nurses to be eligible for these jobs. They get higher pays enabling them to lead better living standards (NACNS, 2004).
More Freedom
There exist many employees who are never happy working under an employer, thus the need for freedom (NACNS, 2007). In the nursing world today, it is possible to combine life and professional experience with other relevant credentials to come up with a self-governed institution for healthcare or establish oneself as a healthcare consultant in various fields.
New Challenges
With increased rates in changing trends in almost any academic and/or professional field, new challenges keep unfolding. It is for this reason that the few people who are willing to take on the new challenges usually seek for further education on certain aspects of a profession (NACNS, 2004). Likewise, nursing has become a non-predictable profession thus calling for many nurses to seek further training so that they can keep up with the dynamic world. In addition, some professionals go for further education so that they can try out other areas in nursing in which they have interest. This calls for one to further their studies since new trends will continue to emerge in the nursing field, and thus require further studies.
References
NACNS. (2004). Statement on clinical nurse specialist practice and education. Harrisburg, PA: Author.
NACNS. (2007). Competency Validation Survey (in press).
Oermann, M. H., & Floyd, J. A. (2002). Outcomes research: An essential component of the advanced practice nurse role. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 16(3), 140-144.