Practical Implications of Morehouse's Invegestion on Emotional Intelligence – Literature review Example

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The paper "Practical Implications of Morehouse's Invegestion on Emotional Intelligence" is a great example of a literature review on psychology.   This report examines the practical implications that a research study on Emotional Intelligence conducted by Michael Morehouse (2007) would have on the Australian Government, Department of Human Services. The findings of this report depict that, it is crucial for staff working at this department to have a high level of emotional intelligence because staff across different lines of work have to address situations revolving around stress management, decision making, and conflict resolution while at the same time adhering to the set public service code of conduct and values.

Therefore, emotional intelligence is an indispensable element in the Department of Human Services. Based on the findings of Morehouse’ s (2007) study, there is evidently need for human resource managers and trainers attached to the Department of Human Services to institute policies, procedures, and regular training programs that reinforce emotional intelligence as a core need in the realization of organizational success. Introduction Emotional Intelligence can be described as the ability to accurately perceive, assess, and express emotion.

It can also be viewed as the ability to effectively regulate emotions in a manner that enhances intellectual and emotional growth (Mayer & Salovey 1997). According to Mandell & Pherwani (2003), emotional intelligence is an ability that entails perceiving and reasoning conceptually with information emanating from inner feelings. Over time, there has been a growing recognition regarding the significance of emotional intelligence in leadership. As a result, a considerable number of studies have been conducted to explore the role of emotional intelligence in leadership and within the organizational context (Morehouse 2007). This report seeks to evaluate the practical implications that a research study on Emotional Intelligence conducted by Michael Morehouse (2007) would have on the Department of Human Services.

Foremost, this report will provide a brief overview of the key findings established through Morehouse’ s study. Secondly, it will explore the implications that the findings of this study may have on the staff or work practice at the Department of Human Services. Moreover, in reference to the findings of Morehouse (2007), this report will provide recommendations on what should be done in order to improve the service climate within the Department of Human Services. Key Findings In his study, Morehouse (2007) investigates the relationship between emotional intelligence and leaders in profit businesses and non-profit health and human service agencies.

This study particularly focuses on establishing the role that emotional intelligence plays in career choice and its influence on work practice. In order to establish this, 64 director-level leaders in profit businesses and non-profit organizations were asked to complete an emotional intelligence self-assessment referred to as the Bar-On EQ-i. The assessment incorporated five categories of emotional intelligence that were used to evaluate the participants.

The five categories incorporated include; intrapersonal, interpersonal, adaptability, stress management, and general mood. Subsequently, descriptive statistics were collected and a comparative analysis exploring the differences between the two groups of leaders was carried out. This study established that leaders working in non-profit health and human service areas are more emotionally intelligent than those working in profitable businesses. Evidently, this study illuminates the relationship between emotional intelligence and career choice. Based on the findings of Morehouse (2007) on this issue, it seems that individuals with high emotional intelligence tend to choose careers that are highly reliant on emotional intelligence.

Such careers include social work, teaching, psycho-therapy, sales, and recruiting personnel in areas such as the military and academia (Mayer & Geher 1996).

References

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Bardzil P & Slaski M 2003, “Emotional intelligence: fundamental competencies for enhanced service provision”, Managing Service Quality, Vol. 13 No. 2, pp. 97-104.

Bar-On R. 1997, BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: EQ-i Technical Manual, Multi-Health

Systems, Inc, Toronto.

Department of Human Services 2013, How can we help you? viewed on July 19, 2013,

Gerdes K & Segal E 2011, “Importance of empathy for social work practice: integrating new science”, Social Work vol 56, no. 2, pp. 141-148.

Langley, A. 2000, “Emotional intelligence – a new evaluation tool for management

development?”,Career Development International, Vol. 5 No. 3, pp. 177-83

Mayer J.D. & Geher, G. 1996, “Emotional intelligence and the identification of emotion”,

Intelligence, Vol. 22, pp. 89-113

Mayer, J.D. & Salovey P1997, “What is emotional intelligence?”, in Salovey, P. and Sluyter, D.J. (Eds), Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence, Basic Books,

New York, NY, pp. 3-31.

Mandell B &Pherwani S 2003, “Relationship between emotional intelligence and transformational leadership style: a gender comparison”, Journal of Business and Psychology, Vol. 17 No. 3, pp. 387-404

Morehouse MM 2007, “An exploration of emotional intelligence across career arenas", Leadership & Organization Development Journal, Vol. 28, Iss 4, pp.296 – 307.

Rahim M.A. & Minors P 2003, “Effects of emotional intelligence on concern for quality and problem solving”, Managerial Auditing Journal, Vol. 18 No. 2, pp. 150-5.

Sala, F. (2004), “Do programs designed to increase emotional intelligence at work – work?”, The Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organization,? viewed on July 19, 2013,

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