Philosophy of Teaching and Classroom Management – Essay Example

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The paper “ Philosophy of Teaching and Classroom Management  ” is a motivating variant of an essay on education. Although teaching is an exciting and fulfilling vocation, it can sometimes be challenging and stressful due to disruptive student behavior, lack of motivation among students, and diversities within the classroom. When teaching, teachers are sometimes bound to encounter students with emotional and behavioral problems who instigate erratic or disruptive behavior in the classroom. Disruptive behavior in the classroom is a major concern for most teachers since it inhibits proper engagement in learning (McGrath & Huntington 2007; Baker 2005).

Similarly, teachers are bound to encounter students who are not motivated or willing to learn. In addition, growing diversity within the classroom poses a challenge to teachers on how they can meet the specific learning needs of each student. In this paper, I will discuss my personal philosophy of teaching and classroom management. Basically, I will illustrate how my personal philosophy of teaching and classroom management and the knowledge I have gained throughout the education course will help me as a graduate teacher in a new school to overcome challenges revolving around disruptive student behavior, lack of motivation among students and diversities within the classroom. My teaching philosophyAs a teacher, I strongly believe that establishing healthy relationships with students plays a fundamental role in realizing positive learning outcomes among students.

Good teacher-student relationships enable students to experience a sense of safety and security and as a result, they are able to open up and communicate freely and honestly about issues pertaining to their learning. This in turn enables teachers to provide proper guidance to students and effectively meet their learning needs.

Hawk, Cowley, Hill & Sutherland (2003) note that good teacher-student relationships motivate students to learn and actively participate in learning. Similarly, Baker (1999) notes that good relationships and interactions between students and teachers lead to better student outcomes. During my course in education, I learned about the importance of developing a rapport with students in order to connect with them and effectively meet their learning needs. Over time, I have learned that the lack of a good rapport between the teacher and students makes it difficult for learners to learn effectively.

Therefore, my personal philosophy on teaching emphasizes the need to create loving, respectful, and caring relationships with students. I believe that building a good rapport with my students will eventually enable me to connect with them and learn about their learning needs, interests, areas of weakness, and strengths. Moreover, I believe that developing loving, respectful, and caring relationships with students can help me as a graduate teacher in a new school to overcome challenges revolving around disruptive student behavior and lack of motivation to learn among students.

For instance, when relationships between teachers and students are characterized by mutual respect, care, and concern, it becomes easy for teachers to understand the needs or concerns of students and find appropriate ways of addressing these needs. For students who lack motivation or interest in learning Hawk et al (2003) predict that good teacher-student relationships motivate students to learn and actively participate in learning. Good teacher-student relationships also enable teachers and students to communicate effectively. Effective communication between teachers and students plays a critical role in minimizing disruptive behavior within the classroom.

When students respect and care for their teachers they are bound to listen when teachers communicate to them regarding what is expected of them in the classroom (Hawk et al 2003).

References

Alexander, P., & Murphy, P. (2000). The research base for APA's learner-centered psychological principles. In N. Lambert, & B. McCombs (Eds.), How students learn (pp. 25-60). Washington, D.D.: American Psychological Association.

Baker, J. (1999).”Teacher-student interaction in urban at-risk classrooms: Differential behaviour, relationship quality, and student satisfaction with school”. The Elementary School Journal 100(1), pp. 57-70.

Baker, P. H. (2005). ‘Managing student behavior: How ready are teachers to meet the challenge’? American Secondary Education, 33, 51-64.

Broderick, J.T. (2004). ‘Initiating experiences with clay and drawing as dynamic conversations’. Canadian Children, 29 (2), 7-13.

Caldwell, L. (1997). Bringing Reggio Emilia Home: An innovative approach to early childhood learning. New York: Teachers College Press.

Delors, J. (1996). Learning: the treasure within. Report to the UNESCO International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first Century. Paris: UNESCO.

Evertson, C. & Weinstein, C. (2006). Handbook of Classroom Management: Research, Practice, and Contemporary Issues. New York: Routledge.

Hawk, K., Cowley, T., Hill, J. & Sutherland, S. (2003). The importance of the student-teacher relationship between Maori and Pasifika students. Set: Research Information for Teachers 3, 44-49.

Johnson, D. (1991). ‘student-student interaction: The neglected variable in education’. Educational Research, 10(1), 5-10.

McGrath, B. & Huntington, A.(2007). The Health and Wellbeing of Adults working in Early Childhood Education, Australian Journal of Early Childhood, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp 33-38

Smidt, S. 2007, A Guide to Early Years Practice, Taylor & Francis, New York.

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