Margaret Sanger Seeks Pity for Teenage Mothers and Abstinent Couples – Essay Example

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Margaret Sanger Margaret Sanger argues that the female generation s under threat and oppression owing to the numerous births they have to procure despite their young ages. She argues that a lot of teenage mothers end up giving birth continuously without any forthcoming relief because of the modern times, and the need for children who would later grow up to become soldiers. Margaret Sanger’s anti-war argument follows the platform whereby women end up low and depreciated at quite an early age. She gives her case example whereby she got married at age twelve, then gave birth to her first child in her thirteenth birthday (Sanger 221). By age seventeen she already had six kids, and there was no forthcoming stop in the near future from her subsequent child bearing sprees.
Paula (207) argues that the jazz age promoted sexual activity among the youth. As such, the jazz music was so attached and close to sex and other sexual activity. The fact that most youths likes listening to jazz music promoted sexuality among the teenagers and youth as they wanted to identify and feel that they belong. This in turn ended up creating numerous teenage pregnancies. The author supports the thesis of this article with his examples on how the highest numbers of teenage pregnancies recorded during the jazz age had something to do with jazz music. As such, the youth would most often meet during jazz shows and jazz concerts ton enjoy the music, as well as make acquaintances and friends, that would later result in early child bearing among adolescent girls.
Edwin (217) talks about the youth and sex at campus, as well as how they engaged in alcoholism and drugs in order to feel part of a group within the university. As such, they used sex and drugs to become part of a group, thereby pitching sex against morals in an epic conscious generational revolt. Clear evidence in the article about the thesis presented by the author was the case of how the youth used sex and morals as a basis of conscious generational revolt. The sexual morals and practices of these youth clearly distinguished them from their elders, thereby making them appear rebellious and unruly. The elderly approached sex as special and sacred, whilst the youth approached sex as commonplace fun activity.
These readings transformed my approach towards sex and sexuality. I now have a conservatism approach towards sex and sexuality, whereby women have to be given the opportunity to give birth at their own pace, and at their own choice. A woman should not be forced to have multiple births, especially at a very early age, such as the case for teenagers. The issues presented in the readings are relevant in today’s world. For instance, having multiple births means having many children and the economy is too tight for a poor parent to support numerous children. Similarly, the youth and music are often prone to sex and other sexual activities when they attend such music concerts or events.
I would use the readings of Margaret Sanger to tackle the issue of overpopulation in the modern world, as well as advocate for family planning in order to control the number of children a woman has. This would protect both the young mother and child from any form of suffering.
Works Cited
Edward J. Larson, “Fundamentalists Battle Modernism in the Roaring Twenties” in Major Problems in American History, Volume II: Since 1865, eds. Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman, Edward J. Blum, and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Cengage Learning, 2012), 217-227.
Paula S. Fass, “Sex and Youth in the Jazz Age” in Major Problems in American History, Volume II: Since 1865, eds. Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman, Edward J. Blum, and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Cengage Learning, 2012), 208-217.
Sanger, Margaret, “Margaret Sanger Seeks Pity for Teenage Mothers and Abstinent Couples, 1928” in Major Problems in American History, Volume II: Since 1865, eds. Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman, Edward J. Blum, and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Cengage Learning, 2012), 217-227.

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