Does Good Nutrition Promote Wound Healing In Patients With Chronic Wounds – Essay Example

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(18, 02, 2009)TABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction……………………………………………………………………………. Study purpose and design. ……………………………………………………………. ..Background……………. .………………………………………………………………Importance of nutritionImportant nutrientsSystematic literature search……………………………………………………………. .Critical appraisal………………………………………………………………………. .Review. ... …………………. ..…………………………………………………………. Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………. ..Does good nutrition promote wound healing in patients with chronic wounds? IntroductionWound management is a major health burden on the society. Any delay in wound healing or/and wound infection puts a great financial load on health care systems. This is due to increase in dependency and hospital admissions. Chronic wounds are a large social, economic and healthcare around the world. Wound care has improved a lot in a few years. With the advances in treatment and the amount of knowledge that we have now has allowed us to evaluate and care for the wounds more accurately.

We can also recognize wounds sooner now and intervene to heal it in a better way. Nutrition plays an important role in wound healing. This is due to the fact that it provides the ingredients required for the repair of the wound as well as to prevent infection (Doughty, 1992). In this article we are going to assess the importance of nutrition to wound healing. We will take into account various findings that have been published in this area.

Study purpose and designThe purpose of this descriptive study was to appraise the hypothesis that good nutrition leads to better healing of chronic wounds. The importance of nutrition for wound prevention as well as healing is deep-rooted (Pinchcofsky-Devin & Kaminski, 1986). Protein is most required in the nutrition that is recommended for wound patients (Lee et al. , 2006). BackgroundImportance of nutritionWound healing depends a lot upon enough intake and proper absorption of the nutrients. Such nutrients include vitamins, minerals, proteins and calories. Lack of nutritional supplies can occur due to intake, which is when malnutrition happens; abnormal absorption, this can be due to GI tract disease; increased metabolic demands, that is draining wounds.

Malnourished patients are at a greater risk of developing problems while undertaking cure. Sepsis, respiratory failure, abscesses, decreased wound healing, and death are examples of such problems. Whereas good nutrition assists healing, malnutrition hinders, impedes and complicates the process (Williams & Leaper 2000). According to Johnson (1993) the three main reasons that wounds fail to heal are poor nutrition, infection and impaired organ function.

Attending to nutrition in wound care is also cost-effective. Healing can be impaired and would take a longer time if proper nutrition is not provided. Sufficient nutrition allows the body to heal wounds. Wound healing is a complicated process. Basically it is when injured tissue is replaced with new tissue. New tissue is produced by the body and this requires sufficient energy and certain nutrients, especially proteins and calories. Nutrition for chronic wounds has to be assessed on an individual basis. Infected wounds need more nutrition due to the fact that they cause greater tissue damage. Malnutrition happens when the patient does not take in enough nutrients in order to meet his metabolic needs.

Usually patients are deficient in calories as well as in proteins. According to Bristrian & Blackburn (1974), 25% to 50% of the patients are malnourished on their admission to the hospital. Another fact is that 25% to 30% of the admitted patients may develop malnutrition during the period they are in the hospital. The combination of being ill and malnourished increases the incidence of concurrent sickness.

Also, there is an increase in the risk of death. Many studies have found the link between malnutrition and risk of complications after operations, especially wound dehiscence (Detsky et al. , 1987).

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