Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Cases of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States – Essay Example

The paper "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Cases of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States" is an exceptional example of an essay on nursing.
As a nurse in a clinic in a large metropolitan city, the population is trooping in large numbers worried about contracting Ebola. They complain of having the flu. Some of the presenting complaints mimic those of Ebola such as fever, malaise, body aches, diarrhea, and vomiting. Recently, a patient died in Dallas, Texas from Ebola ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014). He had traveled to Dallas from Liberia but did not have any symptoms when he left Liberia. However, he developed symptoms four days later and sought help at one of the local hospitals in Dallas but was discharged. No Ebola was suspected. As the symptoms worsened, he sought treatment at Texas Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas where he was admitted, and preliminary tests for Ebola were conducted based on the history of recent travel to Ebola-stricken areas. The Ebola virus was confirmed. Unfortunately, the patient died eight days later ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014).
In triaging patients with suspected Ebola virus infection, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends five standard practices. Firstly, a recent exposure history should be obtained from the patient (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015). This would mean recent travel to Ebola-stricken areas or in countries with poor control measures (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015). Secondly, such patients should be evaluated for signs and symptoms specific to Ebola (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015). Next, the patient should be isolated in a private room or a special enclosed room to prevent a risk of transmission. Fourthly, the Hospital Infection Control Program should be notified and a report sent to the local health department. Lastly, the charge nurse should be in Personal Protective Equipment and continue taking history, physical examination and diagnostic interventions such as phlebotomies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015).