Keystone Light/MillerCoors Canhole – Case Study Example

The paper "Keystone Light/MillerCoors Canhole" is a worthy example of a case study on business. The “Canhole” promotion strategy will enhance overall Keystone Light brand engagement by way of facilitating interaction, acceptance, and sharing by consumers in line with the company’s second objective. The innovative and engaging nature of the promotion will shift the way customers interact with Keystone Light and also add value, purposefulness, and personality to the brand, hence helping the company to achieve this objective. Cruisers can initiate a virtual format of Canhole, whereby membership and usage are rewarded through earning points which can later be exchanged for gifts, trips, cars and other rewards. This way, cruisers can use the game to create online communities with similar tastes and preferences. The company can encourage Cruisers to do so by availing precise data about the target audience in terms of needs, preferences, personality, as well as psychographic and behavioral variables. Lastly, the Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is applicable to this situation as it assists the Cruisers to identify the needs of the target audience, hence providing the online Canhole campaign with purpose, meaning, and direction (Ward & Lasen, 2009). Available literature shows that “product involvement relates to an established and long-lasting connection with a product or brand” (Bruwer & Buller, 2013, p. 40). Consequently, the Canhole promotion can be used to ensure that consumers establish a long-lasting relationship with the Keystone Light brand. Such a relationship will assist the company to increase the overall brand engagement, hence successfully achieving the second objective. The company can use beer magazines and water manufacturing companies to serve as cross-merchandising opportunities for Canhole. Due to the extroverted and fun-loving personality, most Cruisers are likely to be fans of beer magazines to keep ahead of the latest trends in the social scene. Additionally, most Cruisers are likely to consume water in between drinking rounds and Canhole games to keep rehydrated. As such, the company can make use of these marketing opportunities not only to increase brand sales but also to enhance convenience and value addition (Hayer & MacInnis, 2008).  Cruiser’s Personality Traits: Ingenious – the Cruiser demonstrates very smart and clever ways of beating the prevailing financial hardships to have fun. Extrovert – the Cruiser values friendship over all else and has developed a reasonable number of beer pyramids that are dependent on social occasions. Fun-loving – the Cruiser demonstrates a preference to share memorable experiences with buddies and also to crack jokes while drinking. A cruiser is a simple person with simple needs, although he likes to live and enjoy life to the fullest based on resourceful and inventive planning. He does not spend so much thinking about food and expensive lifestyles as he likes to live within his own means. However, he likes to hang out with his drinking peers and the intensity of these interactions increases during the summer. Cruiser values spontaneous, memorable experiences that are as a result of ingenuity and inventive social occasions, not mentioning that he is a free spirit who likes to crack jokes and act younger while enjoying his beer with buddies. The three segments that are likely to include a large number of Cruisers are (1) up-and-comers, (2) blue-chip blues, and (3) white picket fences. All these segments are in the middle-class, implying that they have some money to spend on social occasions though they still have a lot of responsibilities to meet. All consumers in the selected segments are young (<45 years), demonstrating that they may still be interested in having some good time with friends over a couple of beers. They have to spend their money resourcefully and inventively as they have to meet other expenses such as paying rent, implying that most eat out at fast food joints. This makes the ideal Cruiser.