Evaluation of Provisions for Students in Saudi Arabia – Capstone Project Example

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The paper “ Evaluation of Provisions for Students in Saudi Arabia   ” is an excellent example of a capstone project on education. Students are allowed to study on an individual basis. They are supplied with an environment that is suitable for their individual learning (Sally, 2003, 51). For the individual study, the students are given free time and are given access to various sources of information that is supportive of them. The evaluation done in regard to identifying the resources provided to the gifted students of Saudi Arabia shows that the provisional programs started for the betterment of gifted students are not enough.

Gifted schools should be established for the well-being of gifted students where they can get the maximum support and guidance for the selection of appropriate discipline for their further studies and career. The survey done in chapter 10 shows that the gifted schools are the best option for the gifted students because all the related individuals: Teachers, parents and students feel proud to be there and also consider it a better opportunity for their children to learn more. There are a number of projects that are inaugurated for gifted students in terms of provisions for them such as Prince Abdulla Ibn Abdul Aziz Computer Project for Gifted Students, Learning Resource Centres for gifted students, Computer-based Laboratories project for gifted students, Ta’ heel Project and Digital Technique Centres for gifted students.

Similarly, a number of companies have shown interest in providing funding schemes for gifted students such as SAMBA Bank, Saudi ARAMCO, EXXON Mobil, and Microsoft. Like the mentioned companies, other companies should also provide funds for gifted learners to enrich the country with treasures of knowledge.

Saudi Arabia can only proceed because of the gifted students who have the eligibility to lift the country to the utmost heights of advancement. Chapter 1: IntroductionSaudi Arabia as compared to other countries of the world is considered a bit lacking in terms of quality education. Since 1970, specific consideration has been diverted towards higher education. The Saudi Government set the objective of establishing new educational institutes all over the kingdom and also calls attention to the improvement of the contemporary institutes.

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