The Impact of First Marriage Age on Fertility Rate in Abu Dhabi – Capstone Project Example

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The paper "The Impact of First Marriage Age on Fertility Rate in Abu Dhabi" is a great example of a capstone project on social science. The Arab world has witnessed a shift in the age bracket within which people commit to the marriage institution. In 1975, the average marriage age for women was 15 years. There was a significant decline in the percentage of women that married at 15 years of age from 57% in 1975 to 8% in 1995 in the UAE. The evolution of the social and economic sectors of the country was responsible for the decline in the percentage of women that married at the age of 15 years.

Ever since the formation of the UAE in 1971, women started playing significant roles. Currently, the current age group for fertility in Abu Dhabi ranges from 28 to 33 years. However, it is important to note that Abu Dhabi exhibits the highest fertility rate among the other UAE emirates. There is a direct association between early marriages and high fertility rates. The research aims at investigating the impact of the first marriage age on the fertility rate in Abu Dhabi.

The findings of the study would give an insight on the necessary population check policies that would deal with the problem of increasing marriage ages for women in Abu Dhabi. Apparently, the direct relationship between early marriages and fertility rates implies that women get married at an early age have a higher fertility rate. Therefore, they are able to produce more children during their fertility age. However, the increase in fertility rate in Abu Dhabi would have the impact of reducing the fertility rate of women thereby resulting in a decline in the population.

The report comprises a review of relevant literature, the research questions, the research methodology, the project plan, budget, and the challenges and contingency plans. Literature Review The UAE is witnessing an increase in the age of the first marriage of its women. The increase in the age of first marriage has an adverse effect on the fertility rate of women. As opposed to 1975 when approximately 57% of women married at the early age of 15 years, the country has witnessed a drastic change in the situation.

Currently, a majority of women tend to marry at later ages of between 28 and 33 years. The development of the country’ s economy has contributed to the increase in the age of first marriage. Rather than carrying out household roles, as it was the case initially, women have also delved into professional roles. This has had the impact of increasing their marriage-age and reducing their fertility rate (Al Awad and Chartouni 82). Early marriages on the part of women have an impact on the health of both the baby and the mother. The percentage of women entering into marriage at the age of 15 years has declined from 57% in 1975 to 8% in 2013.

The ongoing developments in the social and economic sectors are responsible for the decline in the age of first marriage. In Abu Dhabi, the age of first marriage has risen sharply to between 28 and 33 years. The sharp increase in the rate of increase of first marriage age necessitates immediate measures to check the population or risk a decline in the total population of the emirate.

Early marriages have increased the fertility rate of women besides providing an extended duration of which women can bear children. On the other hand, there is an association between late marriages and decreased fertility rates among women.

References

Al Awad, M, and Chartouni, C. Explaining the Decline in Fertility among Citizens of the GCC Countries: the Case of the UAE. Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, 7.2 (2014): 82-97.

Alibeli, M A. The Effect of Education, Employment, and Income on Reproductive Attitudes and Behavior of United Arab Emirates Married Women. Perspectives on Global Development and Technology, 13.1 (2014): 227-245.

Al-Jenaibi, B. The needs and priorities of women in the UAE: identifying struggles and enhancing satisfaction of employment, education, health care, and rights. Contemporary Review of the Middle East, 2.3 (2015): 238-268.

Bongaarts, John. "Late marriage and the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa." Population Studies 61.1 (2007): 73-83.

Karamat, Kelani. "Perceptions on Implications of Delayed Marriage: A Case Study of Married Adults in Kuala Lumpur." International Journal of Social Science and Humanity 6.8 (2016): 572.

Rashad, Hoda, Magued Osman, and Farzaneh Roudi-Fahimi. Marriage in the Arab world. Population reference bureau (PRB), (2005).

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