Thomas Hobbes Leviathan, The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil – Book Report/Review Example

The paper "Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan, The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil" is an outstanding example of a book review on sociology.
Hobbes’ Leviathan, The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil, commonly called Leviathan, has been an important work as it deals with the structure of society and legitimate government, and it has been one of the most overwhelmingly prominent works of political thought. In the second part of this renowned book, under the title Of Commonwealth, the author offers a convincing account of the commonwealth and the first chapter of this part focuses on the causes, generation, and definition of a commonwealth. In the opening section, there is an explicit discussion on the causes of a commonwealth which stands for security that is not offered by the Law of Nature; nor by the conjunction of a few men and families; nor from a great multitude, unless directed by one judgment. One of the most essential aspects of this reading has been the definition of commonwealth which is one person, of whose acts a great multitude, by mutual covenants one with another, have made themselves every one the author, to the end he may use the strength and means of them all, as he shall think expedient, for their peace and common defence. In the next chapter of the book, Of the Rights of Soveraignes by Institution, the author deals with the act of instituting a commonwealth, the consequences of such institution, which includes ‘the subjects cannot change the form of government’, ‘sovereign power cannot be forfeited’, ‘no man can without injustice protest against the institution’, ‘the sovereign actions cannot be justly accused by the subjects’, ‘whatsoever the sovereign does is un-punishable by the subject’, ‘the sovereign is judge of what s necessary for the peace and defence of his subjects etc. Chapter Nineteen of the book, Of the Several Kinds of Common-wealth by Institution, and of Succession to the Soveraigne Power, name the different types of the commonwealth as monarchy, democracy, and aristocracy. Therefore, the readings from the second part of Hobbes’ Leviathan offer a convincing idea about the author’s concepts concerning commonwealth.