Forum – Book Report/Review Example

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson’s opening paragraph of his novel “Strange Case of Dr. Jekylland Mr. Hyde” provides a vivid description of Mr. Utterson and his perception of people in his largely uncivilized environment. The paragraph portrays him as an introvert and straight-faced lawyer with an exceptional eye of judgment to the society, who was all the same lovable. At the outset, he is a sinister figure of unknown origin and this immediately introduces a reader to the theme of mystery. There are several mysterious happenings in the story, especially surrounding Mr. Utterson’s life as a detective.
Stevenson’s style of writing represents the Victorian era. This means that modern readers will see the contents of the novel as largely old. The opening paragraph has and antiqued expression and flows in a mannered manner that describes a man of considerable repute in the society. To some readers, the language may seem out of touch. “…but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life” (Stevenson). The style contrasts the civilized and uncivilized human characters, which is later evident in the novel. He has an ‘after-dinner face’, which reflects a traditional and Victorian form of writing.
Through his writing style, he uses a split approach to introduce chaos in a society in a society that seems largely dominated by formalities and formal order. “…sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove” (Stevenson). The subject, Mr. Utterson, is a formal and civilized person who exists in a society littered with uncivilized people with questionable behavior. In addition, the style offers a third-party point of view that describes the society from the eyes of one of its members. “…but more often and loudly in the acts of his life” prepares the reader to explore the life of Mr. Utterson from his perspective and that of other characters in the novel.
Work Cited
Stevenson, R. Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.