Through the Eyes of a Child – Book Report/Review Example

The paper "Through the Eyes of a Child" is an exceptional example of an educational book review. The insight on how children's literature reflects society through time is very interesting for me. The book says that in essence children's literature is a mirror to society, and how society has changed from the 15th century onwards, in the general sense and with regard to how society regarded children as well as their families. The book lists some representative works to prove this point. It would be interesting to find out if such generalizations hold not just for a particular society, but for many different societies in other parts of the world. It would be very interesting to know too if there are similarities in the way different societies write about and for children (Norton).  
The chapter shows us different stages in the development of writing for children, and what the chief concerns were at different stages in its history. For instance, I find it very interesting that the Puritan era in the 1640's and the values of that era found their way into the children's books. Where the concerns of the age were about self-discipline and a stress on religious values, the content of such works as Pilgrim's Progress centered on the same. At the same time, I am not surprised at all that woven into moral teachings were stories that also meant to entertain. The adventures in the stories presented there was no doubt meant to satisfy the natural craving of young children for adventure. This is true for boys. From experience, I can validate this. I find it very interesting that this is a common thread between the children's books of the time and my own childhood. One cannot underestimate the value of entertaining children and talk to them in the language that they can relate to. Adventure stories are one, and the chapter also points to fairy tales as another important genre. The aim, of course, is to make sure that children read the books, and find them interesting. The moral and life lessons follow (Norton)