Targeted Multiple Interventions to Reduce Falls for Patients in Acute Care – Assignment Example

The paper "Targeted Multiple Interventions to Reduce Falls for Patients in Acute Care" is an exceptional example of an assignment on nursing.
Targeted multiple intervention strategies are one that has been practiced universally. Its main aim has been to reduce the number of patients falls, especially for patients in acute conditions (Ang et. al., 2011). Whereas this strategy is universally accepted, it has its weaknesses and strengths:
Strengths
It realizes that patients in acute conditions are prone to falls and concentrate on monitoring them, or at least gives them more attention than “normal” patients. The results from the study were consistent so this gave some sort of leverage.
Universal interventions are common and have been used as preventive strategies to reduce instances of patients falling in acute on intensive care centers. They have always been effective.
Multiple intervention strategies for patients have reduced patient falls for elderly patients living in residential and community facilities, as well as for patients admitted in sub-acute health centers. Targeted intervention is thus more effective than usual care.
Weaknesses
The study has a single focus; the findings cannot be applied across all patient groups or other acute settings. Patients studied did not fall into one group. The findings are, therefore, not conclusive enough.
The findings showed that the targeted intervention was more effective than normal care, yet they had not been implemented in clinics and healthcare. It was premature to make such conclusions. In a research setting, it can be argued that the nurses had enough time to take maximum care of the patients, which is not necessarily true in a real-life clinical setting.
Healthcare centers may have limited capacities required for individual attention to prevent falls in acute-condition patients. The logistics involved were not considered in the study. It would mean employing more nurses, which would imply other costs. Implementation would depend on health policies and other considerations.