Mechanical Engineering and MATLAB Environment – Assignment Example

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing

The paper "Mechanical Engineering and MATLAB Environment" is a wonderful example of an assignment on logic and programming. This report considers a parachute designer who is working in a European Space Agency and who is required to design and implement software for testing of the consequences of altering the parachute’ s effective cross-sectional area, Ap to be applied in the spacecraft while the aircraft is making its way back to earth from space. The program designed herein takes the input data from the user. The main inputs include the spacecraft mass, m, and the cross-sectional area of the spacecraft, As, alongside the parachute’ s effective cross-sectional area, Ap and the height of the spacecraft above the earth, H. The overall report can be divided into three main steps:                       (i) Understanding the physics behind the problem                       (ii) Planning the program                       (iii) Designing the Code that can be executed in a MATLAB EnvironmentStep 1: The Physics behind the Problem Some basic physics background is required before solving the problem.

For example, the equations of motion shown bellow will be applied: s = vt    … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. Equation 1  for constant velocity.   For constant acceleration, the following equations (2-4) will apply: v = u + at … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..

Equation 2  s = ut + ½ at2 … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. Equation 3  v2 = u2 + 2as … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .… … … .. Equation 4     Where,     S = The distance covered or travelled in meters t=  the time taken in seconds (s) u = initial velocity in m/s1 ­ ­ v = Final velocity in m/s1 a = acceleration in ms-2­ ­ ­   For the case of a falling parachute, the acceleration due to gravity will apply and therefore,   where is the acceleration due to gravity. When a = g and initial velocity is zero (u = 0 m/s), then Equation 2, 3 and 4 becomes: v = gt … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..

Equation 5 s = ½ gt2 … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. Equation 6  v2 = 2gs … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .… … … .. Equation 7   Further, the physics part for this problem will consider a set of four questions with the following common information: Spacecraft whose mass is 850 kg, Effective cross-sectional area of 5 m2 The height above the  earth 150 km The starting velocity of 0 m/s Considering a spacecraft accelerating towards earth under the influence of gravitational pull, and at a height of 100km above the earth, its velocity will be given by the formula shown below: FD = W – ma But W = Mg where                                                         g = (40 x 107)/(637+H)2 d = H/71+1.4 A = FD/ (0.5 * C * d * v^2                                               m= 850 kg                                               a = 9.81 A = FD/ (0.5 * C * d * v^2; C = 0.7 D = density = -H/71 + 1.4 Kg/m3 t = (2s/g )1/2 for time of travel

References

REGISTER, A. H. (2007). A guide to MATLAB object-oriented programming. Boca Raton,

Chapman & Hall/CRC.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
Contact Us