Aerofoils - How Wings Work – Assignment Example

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The paper "Aerofoils - How Wings Work " is a great example of an assignment on science. Common Misconceptions about Lifts One of the common misconceptions about lifts is the concepts of lateral flow or span-wise flow. It is a common misconception that the wingtip vortices are associated with the unnecessary span-wise flow. It is sometimes believed that lifts and trailing vortices are associated with the flow of air around the pan. This is however a misconception as to the lifts and trailing vortices are not associated with the lateral flow.

Another misconception regards the velocity relative to the skin of the wing. The misconception is that the lift is usually produced by the velocity relative to the wing of the skin. This is because the air has a velocity and pressure everywhere and it is not just concentrated at the surface of the wings (Kemp, 10). Air has a defined velocity everywhere and it is not just at the contact point with the wings. The Magnus effects and the Bernoulli’ s principles are applicable in terms of creating the circulation that is needed for the purposes of carrying out a mechanical lift.

The third misconception about lifts is about the wings. The misconception is that the wings must be curved at the top and flat at the bottom for the purposes of supporting the lift. This is however not true as the pilots may sometimes fly their planes upside down for a long period of time. Had the idea been true, it would have been impossible to fly the planes upside-down. The shape of the wing influences the air circulation as it forms the first point of contact with the air.

It is thus important to note that the airfoils do not produce lift due to their curved nature at the top. How an aerofoil generates Lift The angle of attack as well as the shape of the aerofoil is important in terms of generating a lift. When the airfoil is placed at the correct angle, it deflects the incoming air and hence creating a force. The force is however in the direction opposite to the deflection. This force is usually referred to as an aerodynamic force.

The sum of the obstacle effect is important in terms of generating flow patterns at the wings. It is also important to note that it is not possible for the airfoils to generate a lift at zero angles of attack. Although the curvature of the airfoil is important, it does not affect the generation of the lift. The creation of higher pressure on one side and lower pressure on the other side is also achieved through the turning of the air which creates curved streamlines (Wood 61). The creation of a pressure difference plays an important role in terms of creating a velocity difference.

This is achieved through Bernoulli’ s principles. According to the principle, the air has a high velocity when the pressure is low. The wings play an important role during the process in terms of changing the airspeed. The flow field that is created leads to a higher velocity on the upper side and low velocity in the lower surface. The Kutta condition plays an important role in terms of dealing with the flow of air and the circulation of the air.

This can also be explained by Newton’ s law of motion with regard to the action and reaction. The process thus results in the generation of a lift. The amount of lift that is generated is equal to the circulation, times density, times wingspan, and times airspeed.

References

Beaty, William. Why does the smoke ring? Retrieved on 5 January 2014 from . 2012.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Shape effect on lift. Retrieved on 5 January 2014 from 2014.

Kemp, Nelson H. "On the lift and circulation of airfoils in some unsteady-flow problems." Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences (Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences) 19.10 (2012).

Wood, David. "Aerofoils: Lift, Drag, and Circulation." Small Wind Turbines. Springer London, 2011. 57-75.

Ross, Mark. "Modeling Unsteady Lift and Radiated Sound Generated by a 2-D Airfoil in an Intermittent Flow." Bulletin of the American Physical Society 57 (2012).

Chung, Yongmann "Effectiveness of active flow control for turbulent skin friction drag reduction." Physics of Fluids 23.2 (2011): 025102.

Schubauer, G. B. "Laminar boundary-layer oscillations and stability of the laminar flow." Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences (Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences) 14.2 (2012).

Emmons, Howard W. "The laminar-turbulent transition in a boundary layer-Part I." Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences (Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences) 18.7 (2012).

Rajakumar, S."Iterative approach for optimizing coefficient of power, coefficient of lift and drag of wind turbine rotor." Renewable Energy 38.1 (2012): 83-93.

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