Website Navigation Design Strategies – Assignment Example

The paper "Website Navigation Design Strategies" is a great example of an assignment on design and technology. Website navigation scheme is of vital importance for the reason that it largely influences the visitor’s experience and his first impression – positive or negative. Unless it is planned keeping in view consistency and convenience, the site sucks and the visitor may not feel like coming back to it again.
Perhaps it would be easier and more useful to be aware of what makes navigation ineffective (Flanders et al. 18). To consider an example of what may be called meatless navigation, we may take a look at http://www.restaurantguideatlanta.com. Judging by the home page, the site apparently uses, in a clumsy way, the global navigation scheme, showing the headers of the other pages. The first glimpse of the site would readily cause the impression that you are looking at a cluttered table with a lot many things scattered around. It is clumsy because there is neither elegance nor clarity. The background is garish and the font styles and text colors are tasteless. The visitor is likely to be vexed very soon as much by the seemingly innumerable links as by the links that don’t work (Johnson 19). With so many services and products, it is hard not to feel mixed up. Having failed to highlight the core services, The communication of the site to the visitors, thus, tends to be poor and inadequate.
At the other extreme, to consider an effective model, www.just-eat.co.uk illustrates what good navigability is all about. Without much ado, the site tells you straight away what it has to offer. The entire information about restaurants is condensed in the ‘postcode’. Evidently, the navigation is designed with search engines and keywords and phrases in mind. It makes a sound navigation strategy to limit the number of items on the home page menu to very few. It lets each item gain prominence on the one hand and lends greater authority to the interior pages on the other. There are more links than buttons, thus making the site, even more, search engine-friendly. It may sound strange but true, at least in the domain of website navigation, that the quieter you are, the louder you’ll be heard.