Learning Theories for Teachers by Morris Bigge and Samuel Shermis – Article Example

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The paper "Learning Theories for Teachers by Morris Bigge and Samuel Shermis " is a worthy example of an article on education.   The definition of learning varies in wording and detail from source to source, by implementing this concept Bigge and Shermis have introduced such theories, which although are not new in the world of teaching but are almost forgotten in today’ s teaching. By implementing such techniques teachers can control and rule over the classroom according to their requirements and expectations. A brief perusal of some of the more popular learning texts reveals these theories with respect to several definitions of learning: “ a relatively permanent change in an organism’ s potential for responding that results from prior experience or practice” . Learning theories can be referred to as those experiential processes, which are resulting in a relatively permanent change in behavior that cannot be explained by temporary states, maturation, or innate response tendencies.

Whatever be the definitions of learning theories it seems to share the common theme that learning is a relatively permanent change in the probability of exhibiting a certain behavior resulting from some prior experience, the experience can be either successful or unsuccessful.

Just as the definition of learning varies, theoretical approaches to studying and explaining the learning process have varied throughout the years. Although theoretical approaches to learning can be traced back as far as Descartes, significant experimental studies began only a little more than 100 years ago. Much of the impetus for the early interest in learning was due to the paradigm shift from functionalism to behaviorism and as a result, many different views of learning were generated. From the early studies of Thorndike and Pavlov in the late 19th and early 20th centuries through the 1960s, behavior theorists developed “ global” theories of learning; that is, theories that attempted to explain all aspects of the learning process.

Such learning processes were akin to students as well as teachers. Although a significant understanding of the learning phenomenon resulted from these general process models, more contemporary theorists investigated and explained specific aspects of the learning process. In this report, we briefly examine the traditional teacher learning theories presented by Morris Bigge and Samuel Shermis.

References

Morris Bigge and Samuel Shermis, Learning Theories for Teachers, 6th Edition
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