Qualitative Insights into Stigma as Experienced by Suicide Survivors – Article Example

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing

The paper “ Qualitative Insights into Stigma as Experienced by Suicide Survivors” is a   breathtaking variant of an article on sociology. In their article, Peters, Cunningham, Murphy, and Jackson (2016) seek to explore how people feel stigmatized after their loved ones die as a result of suicide. According to the article, many lives around the globe are lost through suicide and many people are affected in one way or another by each of the suicide cases. Using a qualitative research design, the article provides findings on how people experience stigma when they lose their loved ones to suicide.

The findings show that the stigma affecting those who lose their loved ones to suicide has a devastating outcome on their relationships and the behavior they display when seeking help. The authors of this article note that individuals who lose their loved ones to suicide not only endure immense suffering owing to an abrupt loss of loved ones but also the social stigma that comes with suicide. Using a suitable critique tool, this paper presents a critical analysis of this particular article in order to establish the validity and reliability of the findings presented in the article regarding the topic of how people experience stigma after losing loved ones to suicide. Statement of significanceThis topic is very important in my area of specialty because it helps one attain a comprehensive understanding of how people are affected by stigma resulting from the loss of a loved one to suicide.

This understanding is very important because a huge number of people around the world commit suicide every year and many people are affected in one way or another by each of the suicide cases.

For example, according to a report presented by World Health Organization (WHO), the number of lives lost in 2012 through suicide was approximately 804, 000; but it is believed that the number could be much higher because of the sensitive and complicated nature of such cases and the resulting partial reporting (World Health Organization, 2014). The report further pointed out that each of these suicide cases affects the bereaved in one way or another. According to Peters, Cunningham, Murphy, and Jackson (2016), the people who lose their loved ones to suicide not only endure immense suffering owing to an abrupt loss of loved ones but also the social stigma that comes with suicide.

Cvnar (2005) also notes, “ apart from the pain brought about by the abrupt loss of a loved one to suicide, the bereaved families normally would have to endure the social stigma that accompanies the suicide, complicating their grief and affecting the recovery process negatively” . It is therefore imperative to understand how the affected people feel after losing their loved ones to suicide so that appropriate ways of helping them can be developed and implemented.

Peters, Cunningham, Murphy, and Jackson (2016), note that further training and education is needed for health professionals to improve their understanding of the needs of people who lose their loved ones to suicide. The topic of this article and the critical analysis of the article using appropriate tools is very important because it is one of the ways through which health experts can acquire further skills that will help improve their understanding of the specific needs of people suffering from the stigma of losing their loved ones to suicide.

References

Cvinar, J. (2005). Do suicide survivors suffer social stigma: A review of the literature.

Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 41, 14–21.

Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (2017). CASP Qualitative Checklist. [online] Available at:

http://www.casp-uk.net/checklists. Accessed: August 18, 2017.

Peters, K., Cunningham, C., Murphy, G., & Jackson, D. (2016). People look down on you when

you tell them how he died. Qualitative insights into stigma as experienced by suicide survivors. International Journal of Mental health Nursing, 25, 251 – 257, DOI:10.1111/inm.12210.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
Contact Us