Opportunities and Barriers to Successful Learning Transfer by E. Meyer, A. Lees, D. Humphris and N.A.D Connell – Article Example

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The paper "Opportunities and Barriers to Successful Learning Transfer by E. Meyer, A. Lees, D. Humphris, and N. A.D Connell" is a delightful example of an article on sociology. This paper offers a critical analysis of the research article ‘ Opportunities and Barriers to Successful Learning Transfer: Impact of Critical Care Skills Training by Edgar Meyer, Amanda Lees, Debra Humphris, and N. A.D Connell in Journal of Advanced Learning 2007. The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of critical care skills training on nursing practice for nurses working in the ward (Meyer, 2007, p. 308).

The critical appraisal is thus focused on evaluating the research article by considering various issues in the article such as; the title, summary, introduction, research method and questions, participants, data analysis and results, discussion, and conclusion. In addition, the appraisal will answer a number of questions in relation to the article. Title  According to Newell and Burnard (2006, p. 211), a reader obtains information about the article from the title of the article. Therefore, any title given to an article or any piece of writing should be clear and striking to the reader and more so, the number of words used for the title should be few so that the reader can be attracted to it. Although the title of the article by Meyer and others (2007, p. 308) is quite long, it is clear and to the point.

From reading the title, the reader is able to summarize the information that is contained in the article. That is, it shows that the intension of the authors is to understand the effects of critical care skills training by concentrating on the opportunities and the barriers to sensational learning transfer. Summary/ Abstract The main purpose of having a summary in an article is to provide the reader with an overview of what the research is all about (Punch 2009, p. 337).

It is therefore important that authors use few words when giving the summary of the article and more so, the summary of the article should serve as a preview of the entire article or book (Newell & Burnard 2006, p. 212). The article by Meyer and others (2007, p. 308) provides the reader with an abstract that contains a wide range of information that includes; the title, objective, and background.

In the abstract, the authors have clearly mentioned the aim of the study. They mention that they conducted interviews with 66 participants. The authors also mention in the abstract their findings from the study and they point out learning was associated with the implementation of new skills. The authors write in the abstract that the study would be beneficial to the nursing practice. Introduction The introduction of any written article should state the statement of the problem, the framework, and the background of the study (Punch 2009, p. 330). Meyer and others offer background information about critical care training on a global scale and also in the UK.

They state that previous studies have not been consistent about the information that they have offered about the issue hence the need for the study to be undertaken. The authors have successfully written the introduction because the introduction shows the situation of critical care training in various parts of the world and they pay close focus on the UK. The introduction describes the methodology used and the authors emphasize that they would not base their research on a predefined hypothesis but instead, they will be undertaking exploration of what has been learned about the topic.

Therefore, the introduction of the article contains information that relates to the objectives of the research, the settings, and the insights associated with the title.

References

Bluff, R. & Cluett, E. R. (2006). ‘Critiquing the Literature’, in Principles and Practice of Research in Midwifery, 2nd ed., Ed. E. R. Cluett & R. Bluff, Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, Philadelphia, pp.243-263

Cluett, E.R. & Bluff, R. [Ed] (2006). Principles and Practice of Research in Midwifery, Churchill Livingstone/ Elsevier, Philadelphia

Coughlan, M., Cronin, P& Ryan, F. (2007). ‘Step-by-step guide to critiquing research. Part1: quantitative research’, British Journal of Nursing, vol.16, no. 11, pp.658-663

Greenhalgh, T. &Taylor, R. (1997). ‘How to Read a Paper: Papers that go beyond numbers (qualitative research)’. British Medical Journal, vol. 315, pp. 740-743.

Meyer, Edgar et al, (2007). ‘Opportunities and Barriers to Successful Learning Transfer: Impact of Critical Care Skills Training, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 60(3), pp.308-316

Newell, R. & Burnard, P. (2006). ‘Critical Evaluation of Research Reports’ , in Research for Evidence-Based Practice, Eds. R. Newell & P. Burnard, Blackwell Publishing , Oxford, UK, pp. 209-218.

Payne, G. & Payne, J. (2004). Key Concepts in Social Research, SAGE Publication, London

Punch, K. F. (2009). Introduction to Research Methods in Education, SAGE Publications Ltd, London.

Ryan, F, Coughlan, M. &Cronin, P. (2007). ‘Step-by-step guide to critiquing research. Part2: quantitative research’, British Journal of Nursing, vol.16, no. 12, pp.738-744.

Walter, M. (Ed). (2010). Social Research Methods, 2 Ed. In M. Walter, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria, pp.12-27

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