Children with Attention Deficits Concentrate Better after a Walk - the Exposure to Natural Environments as a Means to Increase Attention in Children Diagnosed with ADHD – Article Example

Article Review of the of number and May 24, Article Review Taylor, A.F. & Kuo, F. E. (2008). Children with attention deficits concentrate better after walk in
the park. Sage Publications [Online]. Retrieved from http://www.lansi-turku.net/sites/lansi-turku.net/files/Walk_in_the_Park-1.pdf
This article examines the exposure to natural environments as a means to increase attention in children diagnosed with ADHD. Seventeen children, primarily boys, were taken on a 20- minute guided walk to a city park, downtown and a neighborhood on three separate days which was followed by a test to measure their attention levels. Children were found to have a significantly higher level of attention after their walk in the city park when compared to the level of attention which was measured following a walk in downtown and neighborhood.
This article is significant because it explores the use of a safe and inexpensive tool of ‘exposure to nature’ as a means to manage children diagnosed with ADHD. The finding of this research is consistent with the Attention Retention Theory which predicts that exposing children with ADHD to natural environments might improve their attention performance (Taylor, & Kuo, 2008). Exposing these children to nature can therefore prove to be a breakthrough in the treatment and management of children with ADHD.
One of the authors of this article is a postdoctoral research scientist while the other is a professor of psychology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Campaign. They are therefore qualified in writing on this subject. The article is well written and clearly describes the procedure and methodology used to conduct the study. The study controlled for various factors like time of day, medication status, level of physical exertion, terrain and noise which ensures the results to be more accurate. Although the sample size for this study is very small, the results are very promising and therefore it should be tested further on a larger sample ensuring an adequate balance of gender distribution as well.