Women Are More Skillful in Achieving Relational Satisfaction Than Men – Annotated Bibliography Example

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The paper "Women Are More Skillful in Achieving Relational Satisfaction Than Men" is a worthy example of an annotated bibliography on sociology. Cole, Nina, D. (2004). Gender Differences in Perceived Disciplinary Fairness. Gender, Work & Organization. Vol. 11/3. This was an exploratory study whereby it coded and analyzed 120 behaviours. The participants included 111 men managers and 30 women managers. The participants were videotaped while having disciplinary discussions with their workers. Four classifications of behaviour were coded and they included: Non-verbal communication Characteristics of the speech Leadership justice Interactional justice A factor examination of the study results produced fourteen elements, whereby 10 of the 14 elements were interrelated with experts’ rating of disciplinary fairness.

Women managers illustrated considerably higher levels of 7 of the 10 behavioural elements. In addition, women managers made supportive interruption than men managers and during a disciplinary discussion, they spent more time on this as compared to men. All these were interrelated with disciplinary fairness. The study results imply that leadership, as well as communication styles frequently found in women, might result in them to being better outfitted than their counterpart men managers in the management of employee discipline circumstances. The study illustrates behavioural differences and their impact in regard to management.

The study emphasizes on the significance of women taking up managerial positions because women are more skilful in achieving relational satisfaction than men. The reasons for this are that women are able to surrender control and also share responsibilities, they help and develop others in addition to being able to effectively develop a network of relationships. For instance, in leadership, men are more focused on exercising authority while women generally take a participative leadership style, where they empathize and understand others.

In sympathizing and understanding others, women are trying to establish a good relationship with others and this clearly indicates that women are more skilful in achieving relational satisfaction. In addition, the fact that the study argues that women are passive and supportive, while men are dominant and hierarchal, the study indicates that women possess the skills needed to develop a satisfactory relationship. Generally, being dominant and hierarchal is likely to put people away and illustrates that the person lacks relational skills. This is in contrast to women, who uphold characters such as compassion, being supportive and understanding other people, and such aspects enable women to build strong relationships, unlike men.  

References

Claes, T. (1999). Women, men and management styles. International Labor Review. Vol. 138/4.

Cramer, D. (2002). Linking conflict management behaviors and relational satisfaction: the intervening role of conflict outcome satisfaction. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. Vol. 19 / 3:425-432.

Hendrick, S. (1988). A Generic Measure of Relationship Satisfaction. Journal of Marriage and the Family. Vol. 50/1.

Nina, D. (2004). Gender Differences in Perceived Disciplinary Fairness. Gender, Work & Organization. Vol. 11/3.

Thomson, A, et.al. (1995). Domains of expressive interaction in intimate relationships: Associations with Satisfaction and Commitment. Family Relations. Vol. 44/2.

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