Internet Safety – Annotated Bibliography Example

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The paper “Internet Safety” is an outstanding example of an annotated bibliography on information technology.
Tynes, B. (2007). Has Internet safety gone wild? Sacrificing the educational and psychosocial benefits of online environments. Journal of adolescents research. Volume 22, Issue 6, p. 575-584.

The main purpose of the author in this article is to give the reader a conceptual framework of how internet safety has been excessively used on teenagers hence deterred many benefits that come along with it. It begins by giving the most important benefits of the internet in the lives of teenagers which are basically with regard to educational and psychosocial issues. The introductory part of this article basically brings out the argument that runs systematically throughout the article. The author is quite systematic in the way he builds the argument. He takes the side that the benefits of the internet actually overweigh its negativities and therefore, to bring out his argument more clearly, he begins by highlighting these benefits. He finalizes the article by proposing several recommendations that parents can follow to safeguard their teenage children from the harmful effects of YouTube and other social networking sites. The article is quite captivating and interesting to read. English is easy which makes it easy to understand. Nevertheless, the article lacks a conclusion which is always important especially for readers who might lack sufficient time to go through the entire paper.

Heath, R. (2008). Technology and teens: can they handle it? Retrieved on 3rd April 2012 from http://184.72.251.154/resources/1/Principal/2008/M-Jp66.pdf.

The author of this article provides an abstract idea of how technological devices allowed in schools have negatively impacted on the education of teenagers. The article is quite precise and direct and directly gives the steps that can be undertaken to ensure the safety of the internet for teenagers. The author, who is clearly a principal in a middle school, provides first-hand information on what exactly happened in his school. He draws most of his examples from his experiences in the school. As the reader, I am able to form an imaginary picture of the real situation which is quite crucial in building my understanding. In comparison with Tynes (2007) publishing, this article is too shallow. In addition, it does not bring out any argument and simply gives a few details concerning a topic that is quite broad.

Chang, C. (2010). Internet safety survey: who will protect the children? Berkeley technology law journal. Volume 25, Issue 501, p. 501-526.

The journal generally gives an overview of the measures that have been taken by various organizations to protect users of the internet from potential harm posed by certain malicious people. The author has discussed several approaches making reference to several states in the United States. Besides these concrete examples, the author also uses research findings and statistics to bring out his points. The journal is an adequate resource for people interested in this particular topic since it has finalized by providing useful solutions to the problems associated with the internet particularly with regard to cyberbullying. In my opinion, the article is rather vague on the issue of internet safety. This is so because it has tackled so many issues at the same time.

Greenhow, C. (2009). Tapping the Wealth of Social Networks for Professional Development. Learning & Leading with Technology, 36 (8), 10‐11

Facebook, cloud computing, Google earth, GPS and YouTube are a few of the new technology that is been adopted into various learning systems across the globe. The author of this article provides three examples of technology that can be used to widely repurpose various educational needs. The articles show how the use of visual search engines, music DJ software, and micro-blogging can be repurposed for numerous educational purposes through adapting a specific kind of knowledge that is referred to as technological pedagogical and content knowledge. The article gives the indication that despite the technology being popular and innovative does not make it an educational technology if proper measures are not put into place. The author indicates that there is a need to repurpose these web tool applications so as to meet the standards required within the education system.

Selwyn, N. (2009). Face working: Exploring Students' Education‐Related Use of "Facebook". Learning, Media and Technology, 34 (2), 157‐174

This article widely identifies the impacts of Web 2.0 technologies with more focus on social networking sites such as Youtube both inside and outside a classroom. In the quest to analyze the impacts, the author compares how students use Facebook groups for academic discussion with social discussion. The author concludes that although Facebook participation among students has exponentially grown, participation based on academic discussion has not necessarily followed the suit.

Deng, L., & Yuen, A. (2009). Blogs in Higher Education: Implementation and Issues. TechTrends, 53 (3), 95‐98

 In this article, the authors share their experiences as well as findings with the use of virtual office hours as the main medium for students to communicate with their lecturers using a Web 2.0 technology namely Facebook instant messaging client. From the article findings, students the use of virtual office hours by students was not significantly different from the use of normal office hours. Nevertheless, participants in classes that were engaged in offering virtual office hours reported a higher level of satisfaction as opposed to those who followed a normal office hour. The authors, therefore, encourage learning institutions to design courses using a virtual office hour both as a learning and teaching tool.

Dunlap, J., & Lowenthal, P. (2009). Tweeting the night away: Using Twitter to enhance social presence. Journal of Information Systems Education, 20(2)

The authors in this article adopt twitter as a tool to facilitate communication between the faculty and students in the online college-level instructional design course. The purpose of this article is to enhance the social presence of students and school faculty thus fostering learner engagement as well as student satisfaction within the course. These two authors reference other examples of academic uses of twitter by providing several sample learners tweets to widely illustrate the various types of communication that occurred between educators and students. The authors conclude by asserting that there are numerous instructional benefits that are linked to the use of social media such as Youtube in exchanging information between students and educators. Further, the author concludes by issuing several guidelines for educators for teachers who may decide to adopt the use of twitter in their teaching systems.



References

Chang, C. (2010). Internet safety survey: who will protect the children? Berkeley technology law journal. Volume 25, Issue 501, p. 501-526.

Deng, L., & Yuen, A. (2009). Blogs in Higher Education: Implementation and Issues. TechTrends, 53 (3), 95‐98

Dunlap, J., & Lowenthal, P. (2009). Tweeting the night away: Using Twitter to enhance social presence. Journal of Information Systems Education, 20(2)

Greenhow, C. (2009). Tapping the Wealth of Social Networks for Professional Development. Learning & Leading with Technology, 36 (8), 10‐11

Heath, R. (2008). Technology and teens: can they handle it? Retrieved on 3rd April 2012 from http://184.72.251.154/resources/1/Principal/2008/M-Jp66.pdf.

Selwyn, N. (2009). Face working: Exploring Students' Education‐Related Use of "Facebook". Learning, Media and Technology, 34 (2), 157‐174

Tynes, B. (2007). Has Internet safety gone wild? Sacrificing the educational and psychosocial benefits of online environments. Journal of adolescents research. Volume 22, Issue 6, p. 575-584.

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